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Sunday Reflection

The good shepherd is one who lays down his life for his sheep

The good shepherd is one who lays down his life for his sheep

We all have our vocation or calling in life. A vocation is a response from within to needs outside ourselves, using our gifts, talents and education to meet the needs of others.
Today Jesus identifies himself as the “good shepherd,” a vocation of love and care. A good shepherd does everything within their power to protect the sheep. If needed, the good shepherd will even lay down their lives for the sheep they care for.
Through our Christian faith we are called to be ‘people for others’ a call to love God and to love our neighbour. Jesus, as we well know, loved us so intensely that he was willing to give up his life for us, his sheep! Jesus died so that we might live!

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St John’s Church is now closed for 6/7 weeks due to refurbishment. Please check latest newsletter for mass times at Sacred Heart.
Sunday Reflection

Sunday Reflection (165)

We all have our vocation or calling in life. A vocation is a response from within to needs outside ourselves, using our gifts, talents and education to meet the needs of others.
Today Jesus identifies himself as the “good shepherd,” a vocation of love and care. A good shepherd does everything within their power to protect the sheep. If needed, the good shepherd will even lay down their lives for the sheep they care for.
Through our Christian faith we are called to be ‘people for others’ a call to love God and to love our neighbour. Jesus, as we well know, loved us so intensely that he was willing to give up his life for us, his sheep! Jesus died so that we might live!

During the Easter ceremonies we too have been witnesses of what was written.
Without our co-operating with Jesus, the message of reconciliation and forgiveness will not be heard. It is not enough for us just to hear the message and implement it in our own lives, as we sometimes seem to think is all that is required of us.
It is clear from the second reading today that “keeping the commandments” means above all the need to follow the commandment of unconditional love, to love others as Jesus has loved us. It is for each one of us today to ask how, given the circumstances of our own lives, we can most effectively get that message across to the people around us.
They all need to hear that greeting: “Peace be with you” and to experience the peace that only Jesus can give.

The Easter Triduum

Saturday, 24 March 2018 Written by

Sundown on Holy Thursday to sundown on Easter Sunday is considered the most solemn part of the liturgical year. The days recount the last three days of Jesus’ life on earth, His Passion, Crucifixion and Resurrection.
Holy Thursday begins with the Mass of the Lord’s Supper where we relive the institution of the Eucharist and the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.
Good Friday is a day of fasting and abstinence. This day Jesus died on the Cross for the sins of the world. Our churches look different, the tabernacle is empty, Jesus is gone!
Holy Saturday, after nightfall we hold the Easter Vigil, we are waiting for the resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Easter Vigil is the pinnacle of the Easter Triduum.
Easter Sunday marks the end of the Triduum, a joyous celebration of resurrection, the rebirth of Jesus and mankind.

Sunday reflection 18-03-2018

Tuesday, 20 March 2018 Written by

Today’s Gospel story tells us that, as well as healing, casting out demons, and preaching, Jesus felt the need to go to a quiet place and pray. This is a lesson to us all, it is in those quiet palaces that we can get in touch with not only ourselves but with God, it is where we hear His voice.
Jesus heard Simon’s prayer for his sick mother-in-law and the fever left her. When she was cured she did what Jesus himself does, she serves those in need. She becomes a disciple.
Lord, deliver me from seeking your help only in times of difficulty. May I grow in grateful love for the ways you daily raise me up and call me in to service for the community

God showed His love for us by dying on the cross in order to save us. The Cross – the place where the Crucified Lord dies – is His very throne of judgment and His righteousness. This is the great mystery of God’s revelation in Jesus Christ.
In the end, God has no desire for the death of the sinner, nor does He take any pleasure in such a judgment. God however does, as He always has, allow us humans to make our own choices even about eternal things. C.S. Lewis wrote in The Great Divorce –
There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, “Thy will be done’, and those to whom God says, in the end, ‘Thy will be done.’

Today we are God’s building blocks. It is up to us all to make God’s presence real in our own lives as well as in our families and community. Only if God is alive in us all the time, will he be alive in our churches. If God is not alive all week in us, God will not be alive on Sunday. To be alive in everything we do is to be alive in our hearts. Where people meet and doors are open, there is the temple of God. In all the groups that meet in St John’s and Sacred Heart, in all the community work that is carried out in both centers God is alive.
May we be people who open our doors and invite God in. And as we do, may God bring us healing, renewal, and peace.

This is my Son, the beloved

Friday, 23 February 2018 Written by

So what is transfiguration, especially as related to us? We are called to that same life in communion with the Lord as Moses and Elijah. God calls to us to give our self-sacrificial love to the Body of Christ just as Abraham did with his own son, his most precious gift from God. When we love God above all else, then that agape love will lead us to lift up our neighbors, forming and transforming ourselves and each other in love. That redirects not just our faith but our lives, putting us in service to Him rather than only asking the Lord to provide service to us. We are called to live in the Trinitarian life, one that will transfigure us to true children of God, through the one authority of Jesus Christ. When that happens, we will have no need to build tents … because we will already be home.

Every Lent offers us a new beginning. It is an opportunity to make our faith fresh. It’s a time to allow ourselves to go into our own wilderness, to make time for some quiet time in a quiet space. Lent is a time of prayer, reading the Word of God and caring for others, it is not just about giving up. It is allowing the tender love of God to become part of who we are and then sharing that love with others.
On this first Sunday of Lent, let us not just concentrate on what we are giving up but rather how our actions, love and care are going to affect others.

The leprosy left him at once and he was cured

Saturday, 10 February 2018 Written by
Again in this gospel we find Jesus moved with pity. Jesus, the compassionate one, enters fully into the human mess of our lives. Leprosy was the most dreaded of diseases in his day. Jesus risks conflict and division for the sake of anybody who was suffering exclusion and isolation from family and community. The most painful wounds we carry can be wounds of the spirit, the wounds we do not like to acknowledge ourselves or show the outside world. These wounds can isolate us, they can create within us the sense of insignificance. So today we ask the Lord to touch us, touch the ugly bits of us, the bits we do not like to look at. Lord, if it is you will, you can make me clean.

Today’s Gospel brings up the importance for us of availability. We do need to be available to all those who are in genuine need. At the same time, there is what we might call the ‘poverty of availability’. No matter how generous and self-giving we are we can only give so much. We need to find a balance between people’s needs and our limited resources. We do not help people by working ourselves to the point of ‘burnout’. We also need ‘quality time’ to be with God, to pray, to be with family and friends and to reflect on our priorities. Today Jesus gives us an excellent example.

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Latest newsletter

22nd April 2018 - Newsletter

memory cafeDo you know someone with memory loss? The Heart of Tamworth in partnership with Home Instead are running a Memory Café in St John’s Community Rooms on every Tuesday, 10.30am – 12.30pm. There is no need to book, just pop in.

bereavement support

With the support of Cruse and St Giles Hospice, as well as the generosity of a large number of volunteer parishioners (& others), we are providing a bereavement support service at Sacred Heart every Friday, 10 – 12am.

If you know of anyone who is grieving, please take them a leaflet from the porch and invite them to join us.

It is open to parishioners and non-parishioners alike.

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Journey in Faith and Catechesis

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The Parish of St John the Baptist (and Sacred Heart) Tamworth offers the opportunity for those who are enquiring about the Catholic faith to join other enquirers on a series of evenings called Journey in Faith.

The format of the evenings generally includes a topical presentation and an opportunity for some discussion. The Catholic Church provides for those inquiring about becoming a Catholic, in a special way and this is called the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults.

Every year we run the journey in faith to help people who are not Catholics to learn more about the faith, to experience it and discern whether they want to play a fuller part in the life of the Church. Do you want to be part of this or do you know someone else who might want to be. This will get under way in late September. If you want to know more then please speak to Frances, Kath or one of the clergy or email the office